The Health Datapalooza Unconference sessions and space enable both planned an unplanned dynamic conversations about experiences using open data - what works, what doesn't, and how might we better collaborate to make progress.

In addition to the planned session noted below, we encourage you to utilize the "unconference" space for conversational style meetings at other times during the meeting.  

Made possible by:

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“Ripples of Health"


Date: Thursday, March 28, 2019
Time: 12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: Oak Lawn room on the Lobby Level

Philanthropic investments and public investments in health are making transformative impacts on the lives and health of individuals and populations. But increasingly, there is a growing sense that it is disproportionately weighted toward "big philanthropy", driven by plutocratic or bureaucratic boards and largely inaccessible to passionate individuals and small mission-driven organizations working to make big differences in communities they are a part of. However, the dedicated people driving these smaller projects and organizations may be too busy doing good to take the time to search for and complete complex grant applications. They may lack the scale to compete for the support they desperately need, especially in a healthcare ecosystem that is growing increasingly consolidated and corporatized. But they are nonetheless already making small ripples affecting health; with just the right help, such ripples can come together synergistically to grow into currents of transformation.

At the Joseph H. Kanter Family Foundation (JHKFF), we aim to find great people and help them to do great things. We aspire to make philanthropy work for passionate people demonstrably improving health in their communities, and for the very communities they serve.  We aim to find people making such impacts and award them prizes in the $10,000 to $25,000 range, where we believe doing so would empower them to take the impacts they are making to the next level.

But we need your help to do so. We believe that through bringing together the collective thought leadership and doer-ship at conferences like Health Datapalooza, we can identify the people for whom such awards would be catalytic. We want you to help us think through the process for finding and supporting these people, and we want you to play leadership roles in ultimately determining who receives these awards. In addition, we intend to further amplify these impacts by building a community, connecting these people with one another and with you, to learn from one another, to complement one another's capabilities, and support one another in advancing human health.

Project Lighthouse:  Governance, Rights, Consent, and Identity for Peer-to-Peer Support Groups on Social Media


Date: Thursday, March 28, 2019
Time: 12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: TBD

Peer-to-peer support groups on social media are a critical lifeline for many patients, filling a gap in the formal health care system.  These groups have grown to become a critical lifeline for many patient communities seeking information and support from peers.  Yet, support groups have a highly conflicted relationship with the social media platforms where they currently reside, with well-founded concerns about privacy and safety.   There is an urgent need to explore questions of data-governance and consent that protects patient social networks from harmful data-sharing practices, while encouraging data-sharing that is beneficial to vulnerable populations. 

Using NLP to Unlock Health Care Quality Measurement


Date: Thursday, March 28, 2019
Time: 12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: TBD

Measuring health care quality is critical to improving it, but efficient and accurate quality measurement can be challenging for both providers and payers. Many metrics cannot be reliably calculated using claims and EHR data, while medical record review is time-consuming, expensive, and usually limited to a small sample. UPMC is developing a Natural Language Processing technology for abstracting quality evidence from electronic text, and for computing a variety of metrics across a population. The technology is designed to make manual abstraction much more efficient in some cases, and to automate measurement in others. Technologies that advance the measurement of quality can open up new opportunities as we move towards value-based care. Join us as we briefly explore UPMC’s initial efforts and early results in using Natural Language Processing to abstract quality indicators from medical records, and then frame a series of provocative questions for discussion by health care technologists, quality experts, and data scientists.
 
Speakers:

  • Pamela Peele, PhD, Chief Analytics Officer, UPMC Health Plan and UPMC Enterprises
  • Rebecca Jacobson, MD, MS, FACMI, Vice President of Analytics, UPMC Enterprises
  • Joined by Mona Siddiqui, MD, MPH, Chief Data Officer, Department of Health and Human Services